Shad Withers

Shad Withers, an Idaho native, received his undergraduate degree in Political Science and Business from Utah State University, where he was a member of the Political Science Honor Society, Pi Sigma Alpha.  Thereafter, Mr. Withers attended  the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, where he received multiple writing awards and graduated cum laude.  Following  law school, Mr. Withers was an attorney in the Product Liability / Mass Tort Litigation group at the international law firm, Sidley Austin in Chicago, Illinois.

Mr. Withers moved to Oklahoma in 2008, where he has successfully represented the interests of businesses and individuals in matters involving breach of contract, insurance coverage, bad faith, construction defect, catastrophic motor vehicle collisions, medical malpractice, negligent credentialing, Title VII discrimination, and the sales practices of national broker-dealers.


Articles By Shad Withers

How much car insurance do I need in Rhode Island?
In Rhode Island, in order to drive legally, drivers must maintain minimum levels of car insurance coverage for each vehicle they own and have registered with the state's Division of Motor Vehicles. The minimum amounts of coverage that are required under Rhode Island law are: $25,000 liability for the
How much car insurance do I need in Utah?
Vehicle owners in Utah are required to maintain certain minimum amounts of auto insurance coverage on any car or truck they want to register and operate in the state. Specifically, those minimums are: $25,000 per person, for bodily injury or death caused by an accident $65,000 total per accident, for
How much car insurance do I need in New York?
New York law mandates that a vehicle owner carry the following types and amounts of car insurance coverage on any vehicle in operation in the state: $25,000 per person, for personal injury protection (PIP) $50,000 total, per accident, for PIP $50,000 per person, for wrongful death protection $100,000
How much car insurance do I need in New Mexico?
In New Mexico, drivers must carry car insurance on every vehicle they own and operate in the state. The minimum limits of coverage are: $25,000 per person for injury or death resulting from a car accident $50,000 total per accident for all injuries or deaths resulting from the crash $10,000 for property
Dram Shop Laws and Social Host Liability for Drunk Driving Accidents in Colorado
Most states in the U.S. have statutes known as "dram shop" laws. These laws can make a business liable for providing alcohol to a minor, or to someone who is clearly intoxicated, if that person causes injury, death, or property damage in an alcohol-related accident.
How much car insurance do I need in Washington?
Washington requires vehicle owners to demonstrate "financial responsibility" in case they cause a car accident on the state's roads and highways. The majority of vehicle owners choose to establish their financial responsibility by purchasing an auto insurance policy. However, you can also comply with
Dram Shop Laws and Social Host Liability for Drunk Driving Accidents in Connecticut
Most states have passed statutes that are commonly referred to as "dram shop" laws.
Dram Shop Laws and Social Host Liability for Drunk Driving Accidents in Arkansas
Most states in the U.S. have civil statutes known as "dram shop" laws, which can be used to impose liability on bars, restaurants, liquor stores, and other licensed vendors if they provide alcohol to a clearly intoxicated person, or to a minor, who then goes on to injure someone else in an alcohol-related
How much car insurance do I need in Kansas?
Kansas requires more than most states when it comes to mandatory car insurance coverage minimums. In Kansas, drivers are required to carry the following insurance coverage: (1) Liability, (2) Personal Injury Protection, and (3) Uninsured/Underinsured (UIM). For Liability coverage, Kansas requires the following minimum coverage amounts:
Dram Shop Laws and Social Host Liability for Drunk Driving Accidents in California
California is one of around 38 U.S. states that have some version of a "dram shop" law on the books. A "dram" is an old British measurement similar to a “shot,” so that's where these laws get their name.